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of state, and former ambassador to the u.n.. dr. albright. [applause] sandy burger, former national security adviser to president clinton. sandy. [applause] leon feater, former national security adviser to vice president gore. [applause] nancy sotoburg former deputy national adviser to president clinton. [applause] and general wesley clark, former supreme allieded commander europe and director of strategic plans and policies for the joint chiefs of staff, general clark. [applause] i'd also like to recognize terry gardener, the director of the library. terry, thank you. [applause] joseph, the director of the cia information management services. [applause] skip rutherford, the dean of the public school of service. [applause] bruce lipped see, chairman of the board of the clinton foundation. [applause] former secretary of transportation rodney slater. [applause] and governor jim guy tucker. [applause] it is now my pleasure to introduce this. he was the deputy director intelligence of the cia. he was chairman of the national intelligence com and served as a assistant director of central
route taken by the u.s. and n.a.t.o., protesting against the drone atakes in the tribal regions which killed dozens of civilians. >> the security deal with the united states is in jeopardy if hamid karzai doesn't sign. that's the message. an n.a.t.o. summit is being attended in brussels. paul brennan is there for us. why can't n.a.t.o. wait for a signature until after the april elections as hamid karzai wants? >> basically because n.a.t.o. says it would be too late to do that. they need a degree of certainty. they are pressing on hamid karzai to sign the agreement because he has agreed to it in principal with talks with secretary of state john kerry. there are budgetary cycles, planning cycles. you can't switch on and off military trainers. they need a degree of certainty for this to happen. if we don't get the signature on that the zero option will have to be on the table and that is an option where the troops will have to be pulled out. it's an option at this point, nout one they are afraid of threatening, if hamid karzai does not sign the agreement. john kerry described it as needi
, in the central african republic, it has led the calls for the u.n. to send in peacekeepers. a muslim leader set himself as leader. they have been accused of committing atrocities against christians. there are reports that christians set up their own groups, but are accused of attacking civilians. desperate civilians were camped at the airport in bangui. >> soldiers are protecting the runway here. the french have a strong u.n. mandate to protect civilians in this country. the airport is completely entry. there are no civilian planes, only military. there's a humanitarian crisis developing. thousands of people have come to the airport because they have nowhere else to go. seleka and anti-balaka are targetting people in their homes. this is the only place they feel safe. >> translation: everyone you see here is a christian. we have no protection. the muslims have sell eka to look after them. we are all central africans, but there is no one to look after us. >> translation: there's nothing to drink or eat. we don't have money to buy anything. >> there are some international charities that are helpi
phones are being tracked based on leaks from former n.s.a. contractors, and interviews with u.s. intelligence officials. >> the report said the n.s.a. can pin down the location of a cell phone and map out relationships from them. the spy agency say it does not target the whereabouts of phones in the u.s. the n.s.a. confirmed it gathers information about americans insidently. >> a scam was discovered by trust wave. militias viruses were sent to thousands of users. it tracked credential. users of facebook, yahoo twitter could be affected. 16,000 accounts were hacked that use 123456. >> anarchy in argentina, why police refuse to put a stop no wild looting in one city. >> american doctors on the front lines of a bird flu scare half a world away. >> they've come a long way since don't ask, don't tell. coming out created new problems. >> you are looking at dallas, were there may be rain together and possibly tonight. >>> good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm thomas drayton. looting in argentina, why the police did not step in to stop it. >> first a look at the weathe
no military on the ground. what company, what battalion is that? we have u.n. units from different countries, serbs, muslims, they are all jabbering and we are monitoring some of it and we are hearing it from other people and that had to be kept straight and you had to know the commanders and the political level and the other nation's level so it was a huge intelligence load on them. the only suggestion i have after all that, i don't know if we are doing this any better, we are not very disciplined in the pentagon about collecting information from people who have gone out and we should be more disciplined. somebody should have chained me to the desk and said write down the name of everybody talked to, every personality, tell me the five most important things and give me strength and weaknesses. i do believe the chinese do this, the soviets did this, the israelis do this and for some reason, the state department does it but for some reason in the military we don't. we just want to know about weapons. >> we will take you on that. >> we just want to know about weapons so we don't get into the p
are patrolling the capital, bangui, as well as other towns as part of the u.n. mandate to restore order. are fearful to leave their homes. cheers of locals, some of the 1600 french soldiers deployed to the central african republic arrive in donkey -- in bangui. the residents have been living in fear of sectarian violence that has left hundreds dead. the first priority for the troops is disarming former select the rebels -0- former seleka rebels who have been terrorizing the population. >> for now, we have patrols that show we are present and strong, to show the groups that the time of impunity is over. tomorrow, all will lay down their weapons. that means if you don't lay them down, we will disarm you by force. >> the violence has not been one-sided. christian groups have responded assaults by attacking muslim neighborhoods in the capital. on monday, the capital archbishop urged christians not to carry out killings. half a million people have been displaced. french soldiers have started moving into rural areas where much of the violence has taken place. president francois hollande says
, they all say that iran should not have a nuclear weapon. and the u.n. it is the world coming together that is moving forward in this direction. and i think doing so in a wise manner, hopefully, they can change some of what has taken place in the region. but we have a long way to go and a lot of work to do. i don't want to give the impression that this is easy stuff. this is very tough stuff. i think secretary john kerry and president obama have been going at it in a slow but methodical manner, and we have to continue to grind it out. host: cnn reported on of the deals they set a particular point of contention is iran's assistance that the right under international agreement to enrich uranium the message to iran should be the should be that you are insisting on the right to enrich. you are. you do not do final negotiations and public. only knows that we have some preliminary to work on. what we did not want to happen mama and why this is important continue negotiating with iran or implemented nuclear programs and you could negotiate without this, but then there will be nothing to preve
decade. it was very interesting because i think that one of the other things i did at the u.n. was try to make sure that sanctions stayed on iraq. that was, you had a cease fire translated into a series of captions, and those were very kind of ham handed sanctions, if i might say. the most, the toughest sanctions on any country at all, and what we were looking at through leon's help was to try to really get more surgical with the sanctions in -- on the form of yugoslavia. one of the problems that was there, because you put two things together, is that there was an arms embargo that was put on that only hurt the countries that had seceded from the seshes. the serbs had a huge standing military, and the reason we wanted to lift the embargo on arms was that the others were not getting any. there's two different aspects to this, but sanctions are a tool, and they do hurt, and the question is, how do you turn to what are known as smart sanctions to just the comprehensive ones? i think on the other questions, sandy, i mean, these documents -- >> all i have to say is that when you design a st
communication with mexican officials. now, officials at the international atomic energy agency, which is the u.n.'s nuclear watchdog group, are also involved in this investigation and they say there are more than 100 incidents of theft regarding radioactive materials reported to their agency every single year. bret. >> casey stegal, thank you. >>> the u.n. involved in another case saying there is growing evidence that syrian president bashir al assad and senior officials have been involved in war crimes and crimes against humanity. the complex dynamics in syria have the u.s. trying to talk peace with what is literally the lesser of two evils. good evening, katherine. >> reporter: the national security council staff and the intelligence agencies are referring all questions about the u.s. government's contacts with syria to the state department where today a spokesperson tries to play down direct talks as old news. >> we've been engaging with the broad section for a long time. it's been ongoing. of course we're incredibly concerned about the terrorist threat in syria. we've made that very clear. t
and interreligious crimes that can degenerate. the security council and i welcome the u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon who has given a mandate to re-establish order to protect the population and to insure stability that then lead to elections. >> more now on our top story. the death of nelson mandela. south africa's foreign minister. at mandela's insistence. he served in the first post apartheid government. >> that kept nelson mandela in jail, and he then served under mandela in south africa's first cabinet. it was his task to publicly defend the continued imprisonment of mandela and other political developments. privately he long lobbied for mandela's release. >> due to the effect that mandela ought to be released that we are making a bigger martyr of him every day that he stays in prison. and that is international acclaim. and it would be growing to an extent that we would not be able to hand it will any longer. unfortunately at that time it was. >> eight years later nelson mandela bake a free man. >> he spent 27 years in prison. and the day he was released he displayed the--he displayed the ac
. soldiers are protecting the airport and the runway. the french have a strong u.n. mandate to protect civilians in this country. you can see there's no civilian planes landing at the airport, only military runs. there's a humanitarian crisis developing here. thousands of people have come to the airport because they have nowhere else to go. seleka and anti-balaka are targetting people in their homes. this is the only place they feel safe. >> translation: everyone you see here is a christian, there's no muslims, there's no protection. the muslims have seleka's to look after them. we are all central africans, but we have no one to look after us. we have nothing to drink or eat. we don't have money to buy anything. >> there are some international charities that are helping these people, but food and water are limited in the city. there are almost half a million people around the country who have lost their homes. the french have sent a fighter plane flying low over the city in a way to intimidate the seleka and anti-balaka fighters. the big question is when will the people go home, will t
detonated. belgrade was heavily bombed by the nazi german air force in 1941. >>> a u.n. report ranks sweden as the number one country in the world to grow old in. by 2050 older people will outnumber under 15s for the first time. in sweden it's feared there won't be enough health care workers and facilities to take care of them all. the government is looking at new ways to help people stay in their homes for as long as possible. linda newburg reports now from southern sweden. >> reporter: it's coach time at this nursing home in stockholm. most of the residents are over 80-year-old and have different degrees of dementia. she's 98, and her room is filled with photographs and momentos of her past. this facility tries to create a familiar atmosphere for its residents. it represents the government's models of what an elderly care facility should be. not all nursing homes in sweden look like that, but they could according to the head manager here. >> reporter: we don't have a special recipe pour philosophy. we emphasize human contact and care for every individual's personal needs. we're just doing
, the president who has been speaking to the european commission president and the secretary general of the u.n., there is lots of international pressure here to try to stop further violence which was witnessed a week ago when the police heavy handedly moved in against the protesters causing injuries. there was an international outcry against that. that is right, that is the next crucial moment tuesday but i think the hope is some kind of compromise, some way through this can be found without further clashes between the protesters and the riot police. >> reporter: tim, thank you very much for getting us up to date and tim friend is from the capital kiev. you are watching the al jazeera news hour and still ahead severing family ties and kim jong-unhas been under the gun for drugs and gambling. and this is the streets of singapore and in sport find out why this shot from onon left tiger woods at the pga challenge in california, those details coming up. ♪ 27 people have been arrested in singapore after the worst riot in more than 40 years, two police vehicles were set a light after they hit and
1600 groups in the colony and u.n. improved an increase to 6,000. another attack in iraq as violence escalates and a car bomb exploded outside of a cafe in the northeast region killing 11 people and explosions on sunday killed 39 and injured more than 120. most of those attacks happened on busy commercial streets. u.n. says 8,000 iraqis have been killed this year. drone strikes and taliban were the topics today during high-level meetings in pakistan and chuck hagel met with sharif and the army chief and this is the first since the tirade that killed bin laden in 2011 and he flew and met with troops but not the president and hamid karzai is refusing to sign before the year's end. they are backing the afghan counterparts decision for the deal and karzai met in tehran sunday with rohani and calling for trade and security and they opposed the presence of troops in afghanistan, the only country asking karzai not to sign the security deal. the security agreement would secure billions of dollars afghanistan needs to boost economy but in limbo the currency is falling and as al jazeera jayne
.s. military is the strongest in the world. u.s. and n.a.t.o. leaders are meeting in bruls -- brussels hoping to percade hamid karzai to sign. keeping u.s. military troops past 2014. after a second day of talks, paul joins us. >> n.a.t.o. officials meet with afghan's foreign minister. could we be closer to a signature. >> i think the principal you have to think of when you talk about these meetings, is like an apple press. you tighten the pressure in the hope that the juice flows. there's a blockage in the pipeline. it is hamid karzai. he's not willing to sign the bilateral agreement. even john kerry will not speculate as to why he will not sign it. hamid karzai at the moment says no. susan rice went to kabul, he said no. as john kerry says on tuesday here in brussels, there are some 50 nations who are part of the effort to stablilize afghanistan. they have budgetary cycles, planning cycles, and you don't turn off military cycles like this. there has to be planning involved. n.a.t.o. says it needs the signature before the end of the year. n.a.t.o. officials said any signature will do. hamid k
under nelson mandela in the first democratic cabinet. as u.n. ambassador and foreign minister, it was his task to publicly defend the yisent of nelson mandela and other political opponents. privately he maintains he lobbied for nelson mandela's release. >> in 1982 i submitted a memorandum prepared by my department. and to the effect that nelson mandela ought to be released. we were making a bigger martyr of you every day stays in prison. that is international. and status. would be growing to an extent where he would not be able to handle it. eight years later nelson mandela became a free man. here you had a man who spent 27 years in prison and the day he was released. he displayed the - he displayed the cuban and energy to the person. who has been a president before. amazing what this idea, in the minds of people and for that matter, into world affairs. >> and central to the success of the process, that led to a peaceful transfer of power, was nelson mandela's insistence that there need be no losers, that all could win. >> we were not capitulating. you do not capitulate and
madeleine albright, former secretary of state and u.s. ambassador to the u.n. dr. albright. [applause] >> sandy berger former national security advisor to president clinton. sandy. [applause] >> leon fuerth, former national security advisor to vice president gore. [applause] >> nancy soderberg, former deputy national security advisor to president clinton. [applause] >> and general wesley clark, former supreme allied commander europe and director of strategic plans and policy for the joint chiefs of staff. general clark. [applause] >> i would also like to recognize the director of the clinton library. thank you. [applause] >> joseph, the director of the cia information management services. [applause] >> skip rutherford, the dean of the clinton school of public service. [applause] >> bruce lindsey, the chairman of the board of the clinton foundation. [applause] >> forward slash future of transportation rodney slater. [applause] >> and governor jim guy tucker. [applause] >> it is now my pleasure to introduce dr. john gannon. dr. gannon served as the deputy director for intelligence at th
the tributes after ban ki-moon, the u.n. secretary general speaks, the tribute by foreign dignitaries, then the president of the united states, barack obama, followed by the leaders of brazil, china and india and then cuba. raul castro. they will all be on this little stage, this little area in front of 90,000 people who have gathered in the soccer stadium so there could be a moment where president obama and raul castro may shake hands, may talk, who knows. >> be interesting to watch if they shake hands. that was the big thing, the gore people wanted no physical contact or substantive communications because of the relationship between the two countries. obviously, you can get as close as we are at an event like that and we will see what happens. you watch something like that. for the former presidents to be together, you know this because you have been at big events, the opening of presidential libraries here at home, the king hussain funeral, you had a group like that. the pope john paul ii funeral, you had several presidents together. it's a security challenge, number one, then the
seem like the administration has given up something they shouldn't be gig up. >> this violates the u.n. security council resolutions, the u.n. proliferation treating and empowers other countries in the northeast to say we're going to strike an accord to allow you to continue your uranium enrichment and it encourages other countries to say we've abided by this and if you allow iran to do this, why can't we do this? >> we didn't stop pakistan. we didn't stop north korea. the idea that iran can be stopped if they want to make a nuclear weapon seems to not have a great historic precedent. >> they have the know-how. they're always going to have the know-how. what would it take if they make the decision that they're going to pursue the bomb? it would take a sustained military campaign. not just a bombing campaign because a bombing campaign would set them back for a period of time, but if they were determined, it would have to be repeated bombing campaign and it may involve boots on the ground. because that is often an awful prospect, we need to try everything, in my view, to see if that he i
border are. >> the u.n. refugee agency agrees. >> often, there's a lot more check points in dallas, there's certainly a lot of fighting going on there. as you can see, this is a very different location that people find. this is an easier place to come through. >> it will take up to four days for the refugees to oh get screened, registered and taken to a camp. their longer journey is the one that's yet to start. that's the one for human dignity in compile. >> protestors in ukraine returned to the street in force today, this after reports the country's president met with the russian president. the meeting sparked fears an economic deal might be reached with russia quarterback further distancing the ukraine from the europeandown. >> there are reports that the ukrainian leader has signed a deal with russia securing according to reports, $17 billion worth of aid. ukraine, of course, desperately needs this money, simply to pay its creditors, the country's reserves are starting to run low, and it is in dire economic circumstances. these reports about the deal with russia are unconfirmed, but of
implicated the syrian president and more than 100,000 people have been killed in the conflict. the u.n. says afghanistan is the world east most dangerous place for relief worker and said attacks on aid workers fripelled there and 36 have been killed and 46 injured and u.n. are not saying blame for attacks but taliban has taken responsible for many of them. activists including one american boerted boats in the gaza strip with restrictions on waterways in the mediterranean sea. israeli government said imports are monitored to prevent dangerous materials from entering occupied territory and the six mile restrictions hurt the economy and al jazeera's nick has more from jerusalem. >> six years israel controlled the seas and today activists wanted to take them back and living in gaza cannot go six miles from the coast and war ships block everything going in and going out and they say that strangled the economy and so they challenge the blockade and going straight for israeli ships and aware of the risk and they arrested and they attacked for sailing more than six miles out. >> we are armed with in
violence honestly since two thousand and nine the u n s to ninety nine pence and being killed since the start of the key we have an online project which has wanted to iraq's ongoing funding to confine that help calm. hundreds of indigenous brazilian people have attempted to storm government buildings in the capital itself to the justice ministry grade and new rooms for the chemo patient making plans for next year's world cup. security guards at the presidential race heats at the sprite in protest as he pushed at distract the national costume contest on the ministry of justice saying the grill was to undermine the rights to an ancestral lands. so it was on the right call. next its mx and slicing my concert i live to noon. i am. we often see the middle east is a place that's a term of revolution people call it seemed to be very fired up as well. masses of protesters to force a government ministries to shut down by storming the look you in waves. one such ministry is the kind of cool that of the american fbi which has been accused of killing around ninety people in a crackdown on thos
led the u.n. to send in peace keepers. they took pow of a coup in march and named themselves the first muslim leaders. they are accused of committing atrocities against christians. and they are also accused of killing civilians. peter, you're right 300 kilometers north of bagui. what is the situation there right now? >> well, thank you for having me. we saw very fires fighting. the troupes have fought very hard to separate the christians from each other and they have killed 11 muslims within the border. both sides are committing atrocities. just a few hours ago seleka fighters left a mother's body right next to her crying baby. >> what is in control right now? >> after the seleka forces were defeated. they took their forces to the catholic church where 35,000 people are sheltering. ththey sent them outside of the church and fired into the compound. if the peacekeeping forces were able to negotiate a departure of the anti-balaka forces, but both are using atrocities against the people to rule and take control. right now it's the seleka forces. >> you mentioned the african peacekeeping
with realities that we had before us. >> margaret brennan with secretary of defense hagel today. u.n. weapons inspector as roifed this morning in a heavy water production plant near the eye rather thannian capitol of tehran. it is one of the sites iran agreed to open up as part of last week's nuclear agreement. elizabeth palm certificate in tehran tonight. liz, what do we know about what happened? >> good evening, jeff, well, we're past the first hurdle. iran had promised to let the inspectors into this site which is associated with a very controversial reactor which could, when it's working, produce plutonium. they said the inspector kos go in, two of them want in today. and there are talks of their next going to be allowed to inspect iran's uranium mines which is something the international community would very much like to have a good close look at. >> liz what is the reaction to all of this inside iran? >> the majority of people see this deal as welcome relief from sanctions. but the hard-liners are very much against it. in fact, president rouhani has been accused by the hard-liners of se
was toppled over. people taking turns taking aim. >>> and from iran tonight, state tv is reporting that u.n. inspectors have begun their work. it comes after that landmark short-term nuclear agreement. this weekend in washington, meantime, president obama giving the odds of achieving a long-term agreement with iran 50/50 at best. >>> meantime, the pentagon under fire tonight for its decision to buy combat helicopters made in russia. lawmakers on both sides, asking, why not made in america? here tonight, abc's aditi roy. >> reporter: tonight, new questions arise as to why the pentagon chose to spend more than $1 billion on dozens of russian mi-17 helicopters, to support afghan troops, bypassing u.s. manufacturers. the defense department signed the deal more than two years ago and pentagon officials defended the move, citing a 2010 top secret study, which they said recommended the russian helicopter as the top choice. but the associated press has obtained excerpts of the study, which said the u.s. manufactured chinook helicopter was the, quote, most cost effective single platform type fleet f
existing u.n. resolutions and previous violations by iran of its international obligations, that we don't recognize such a right, and if, by the way, negotiations break down, there will be no additional international recognition that's been obtained. so this deal goes away and we're back to where we were before the geneva agreement, subject -- and iran will continue to be subject to all the sanctions that we put in place in the past and we may seek additional ones. but i think what we have said is we can envision a comprehensive agreement that involves extraordinary constraints and verification mechanisms and intrusive inspections, but that permits iran to have a peaceful nuclear program. now, in terms of specifics, we know that they don't need to have an underground, fortified facility like fordow in order to have a peaceful nuclear program. they certainly don't need a heavy-water reactor at arak in order to have a peaceful nuclear program. they don't need some of the advanced centrifuges that they currently possess in order to have a limited, peaceful nuclear program. and so the quest
welcome the u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon, who has given a mandate to an african force to protect the population and ensure stability that would then lead to election. >> our correspondent is in central african report and we have this report on the violence that has taken over bangui. >> reporter: gunfire echos through the city. [ sirens ] >> reporter: some say this was an attempted coup d'État. security forces called celica. the streets of this once bustling city are almost deserted. those who venture out risk ending up like this. it's not clear how many people have died in this mortuary we counted 25 bodies. this woman lost her son. she didn't want to give us her name. >> i don't know what is happening in central african republic right now. if you go in you see people on the ground like animals who have been slaughtered. with the state of the country, where can i go? >> this is where most of the injured have been brought. most have wounds, women are being treated along side government soldiers. [ sobbing ] >> this woman asked god, why has this happened? there christian and musl
in infested skies. >>> a team of u.n. weapons inspect orders arrived in iran today. it's the first time they have had access to a nuclear facility in more than two years. president obama has said yesterday the pursuit of a long standing deal with iran is as likely to fail as it is to succeed. iran has agreed to temporarily roll back its enrichment offun rainium which would be used to generate nuclear energy. iran insists it's nuclear program is peaceful. >> we have to not constantly assume that it's not possible for ran, like any country, to change over time. it may not be likely. if you ask me what is the likely that we are able to arrive at the end state that i was just describing earlier, you know, i wouldn't say that it's more than 50/50. but we have to try. >> iran, the united states u.s. and five other world powers will meet this week to discuss a six-month deal to halt iran's nuclear program. the president said the deal which lifts sanctions has helped his country's economy. >>> this week on talk to al jazeera, iran's foreign minister mohammed zarif was asked if his country would
: former u.n. ambassador bill richardson who says his north korean contacts aren't responding told cnn on sunday that kim jong-un isn't following north korea's usual pattern of releasing americans after getting a purported confession. >> so this is baffling. but this is a new regime of the new leader. and i suspect he's sending different signals but nobody knows what those signals are. >> richardson has some of the best contacts in this country with north korean leaders. so the fact that they're not responding is of some concern. barbara starr, cnn, the pentagon. >> still to come here on "around the world," a group of wounded veterans trekking across antarctica and they've got a british royal in tow. we'll check in on them and also, it could be life imitating art. police told cnn that the "fast and furious" actor paul walker may have been drag racing when he died in that car crash. we'll have details for you coming up next. so, with chevy's black friday sale, the price you see is the price you pay? yep, best prices of the year. i can't see. honey. [ laughs ] brad. yeah? what are you do
and muslim rebels. soldiers reached the city this morning, with the permission of the u.n. security council to use force. the french contingent will eventually reach 1,200. the embattled president of ukraine-- viktor yanukovych-- met today with russian president vladimir putin, in the face of ongoing protests back home. the demonstrations erupted after ukraine's leaders backed away from improving ties with the european union. moscow wants ukraine to join a trade bloc dominated by russia, instead. still to come on the "newshour": good jobs news, but not for the long-term unemployed; fast-food workers fight for a living wage; what mandela meant for south africa. plus, shields and brooks. >> woodruff: now, a pair of reports from the jobs front about a divide in the u.s. economy: the labor market seems to be getting stronger once again. yet for many on the lower end of the income ladder, the big gap in wages is sparking a budding movement. we begin with economics correspondent paul solman on the unemployment rate's drop to a five-year low, even as many jobless americans face more difficult time
a point this violates a u.n. security treaty and empowers other countries to say we're going to strike an accord with you to allow you to continue your uranium enrichment. all that does is encourage other countries within the middle east to say we abided by this. but if you allow iran to do this, then why can't we do this? that's my concern. >> right. we didn't stop pakistan. we didn't stop north korea. so the idea that iran can be stopped if they want to make a nuclear weapon seems to not have a great historic president dent. >> you know, they have the know how. what will it take if they're going to pursue the bomb? it would take a sustained military campaign, not just a bombing campaign. a bombing campaign would set them back for a period of time. but if they were determined, it would have to be repeated bombing campaign and may include boots on the ground. because that is such an awful prospect, we need to see if there is a peaceful way to put an end to this program. that's why i think the interim deal makes sense. i share the skepticism that we can get to a final deal. >> the chanc
. speaker, today marks the 1 u.n.th consecutive -- 100th consecutive legislative day the safe climate caucus has spoken on the house floor, calling for action to address climate change. the science itself is clear. climate change is already contributing to significant environmental changes. floods nted droughts, and hurricanes to name a few. but climate change is not only a serious environmental problem, it's a serious economic problem as well. american businesses, large and small, understand this threat. and they're responding accordingly. they're increasing their energy efficiencies, reducing pollution, and implementing more sustainable business practices. american businesses understand that the changing climate is already hurting their bottom lines. and they're taking action to strengthen their competitiveness and their resiliency. congress should be doing the same. yet our majority continues to stick its head in the sand and do nothing. climate change poses a real and immediate threat to our economy and we really can't afford to wait any longer. i urge my colleagues to join with america
. and not on the situation. >> the u.n. refugee agency agrees. >> there's more checkpoints in dara and a lot of fighting going on. as you can see, this is a quit location. this is an easier place to come through. >> it will take up to four days for the refugees to get screened, registered and taken to camp. the longer journey, however is yet to start. that is the search for security and human dignity in exile. >> more than 1,000 syrian refugees crossed into jordan in recent days. many walked six miles through the dessert. >> protests in ukraine are in the third week. widespread demonstrations in the capital started after the president backed away from an agreement with the european union. the deal w the deal was -- russia pressured them to sign a deal >> paying tribute to nelson mandela. a live report where a nation continues to honour the man they call father. >> plus, the changes ordered in the wake of last week's deadly commuter train derailment. >> i'm john henry smith. she them the money. someone has. it wasn't the yankees. details ahead in sport. >> start with one issue. add guests from all sides
to get a constructive soup -- discussion along the lines of the you and security -- u.n. security council resolutions. host: here is john from new york, republican line. caller: i would like to ask the guests about u.s. foreign-policy posture all over the world. it seems that the u.s. is leaving parts of the world to other actors such as russia in the middle east, and our allies around the world have less and less trust with u.s. to back them up in a situation where they get in trouble with one of these other actors like china is missing in defense identification zone that they're setting up. south korea and japan, for instance, had their airlines say that we will not respect that zone. the u.s. told airlines to respect that zone the u.s. all over the world where they back down, now they are backing down in china, and putin is trying to re-institute the soviet union. all over the world the u.s. is backing down in every situation. can you explain that please? guest: john, thank you for your question. i will talk about two things. i will talk about syria and then china. you raise two import
general on behalf of the u.n. response appreciation. we appreciate you taking the time to speak to us. is there any single message that nelson has made throughout the years that run particularly true with you. and you think applies today in africa and throughout the rest of the world? one of the thing he often said was that the whole cause of freedom was still a work in progress. >> africa had many countries in the world during last century and many centuries before have suffered from this rule. and violation of the human right and human dignity. only because of such a great man like nelson mandela is possible that particular people in africa and elsewhere are able to enjoy freedom and human dignity. i'm still very much humbled. many people, particularly people -- [inaudible] totally abuse and violated. we have to learn the wisdom and determinations and commitment from all of president mandela to make this world better. that is what i really wanted to exprez my deepest admiration and respect to president mandela and people of south africa. and all people of africa. thank you very much
components, and the enrichment component. you had six u n resolution saying enron -- saying iran should not engage in enrichment because they had gotten into a rational actor on the world stage. they are the largest state sponsor of terrorism in the world, including trying to call -- to kill the saudi ambassador there by bombing at a restaurant in washington, d c if you look at the behavior and the three components of the wasram, and i thought this a serious mistake. they made this mistake in syria, if you do not include your allies you would create decision. -- create suspicion. he had these secret talks in om idea,ch was a god awful and even if you like the deal you have created a level of suspicion now on the deal that makes our allies wary and empowers our adversaries use. the missile part of the program is not touch in the deal. they can continue to do missile the filament. the weaponization of their program is not touched. they can continue that. the facility they think they do that is not open to expect her's. if you're looking at triggers and for relation of all the modeling the
past the using fuel crops for fuel has got to have negative impacts. the u.n. estimates 815 million people suffering from under nourishment. what i think the commission are overlooking or don't give enough weight to is undernourishment is tragedies of poverty and politics. the food they cannot afford to buy and nobody is using is used for christmas biscuits or shampoo or fuel is of no consulation to them. secondly, the crops used for fuel were developed and grown in conjunction with the demand for those fuel crops. if the bio fuels industry was decommissioned -- >> we wouldn't necessarily grow anymore crops for food. >> exactly. exactly. a final point would be that bio fuels existence globally on all continents provides a strategic fuel reserve for the world in the event of and possibly with the expectations of future climatic events of greater and greater scale the world will be very pleased that there exists an industry that the feed stocks are being used and have the correct logistic call capacities and employment capacities globally to redirect. >> what's the -- is there a break
, into the western european and others group at the u.n. in geneva. we fought hard for that. but think of the new markets that would open up and the bridges between people that peace would build, think of the flood of foreign investment and business opportunities that would come to israel and how that would change the lives of everyday people throughout the region. as stanley fischer, the former governor of the bank of israel said, a peace agreement with the palestinians could boost israel's gdp in a short period of time by as much as 6%. israel would also enjoy a normal , peaceful relationship the moment this agreement is signed with 22 arab nations and 35 muslim nations -- 57 countries in all. it is not beyond our imagination to envision that a new order could be established in the middle east, in which countries like jordan, morocco, a newly independent palestine and an internationally recognized jewish state of israel joined together to promote stability and peace. ben gurion knew from the start that if his young state were to do more than just survive, if israel were to succeed, it would nee
that the very beneficial position u.k. have n the through that will change. you have seen in a statement last week, statements about tax addressing resident, ownership of esidential property and clamping done on that tax benefit. think that will just increasingly move in that direction. moral and g social, political shift in taxation. >> is there any other country? a lot clients that say i want to do everything i get less where do tax? > i think in is a combination between really cutting down on contrived taxsive voidance as compared to a growing move generally in the more developed countries of looking at tax systems and how can be more beneficial and easier to work with. so, you encourage people to pay a reasonable amount of tax but them for take everything they have got. talking about the u.k., it is has esting because it evolved from quite an un a more ve tax system to attractive system now. so there is a recognize next tackle the egregious stuff but otherwise encourage people to take a bit of a tax hit but encourage them to undertake heir activities and sets up business and become reside
former u.n. secretary kofi annan, called a the loss of man dale la a -- mandela a loss for the world. here is a little bit what u.k. prime minister david cameron had to say. >> one of the brightest lights of our world has gone out. nelson mandela was not just a hero of our time, but a hero of all time. >> reporter: now in a strange twist news of the death of mandela last night broke during the u.k. premier of his biographical movie "a long walk to freedom." mandela's passing was announced at end of the film, we're told to gasps even to screams in the audience. in attendance a members of mandela's family and royal family. the vatican marking this day. pope francis calling nelson mandela's promotion of human dignity, against violence, for truth, absolutely monumental, everybody, religious figures, leaders, rock stars, models, you name it, all coming out and expressing their condolences and their love for the man. back to you. bill: a lot of people have been waiting for this moment but the reality when it happens is still a different thing. greg palkot, looking forward to your coverage
, and the enrichment component. you had six u.n. resolutions saying iran should not engage in enrichment because they had been a rational actor on the world stage. they are the largest state sponsor of terrorism in the world, including trying to kill the saudi ambassador there by bombing at a restaurant in washington, d.c. if you look at the behavior and the three components of the program, and i thought this was a serious mistake. they made this mistake in syria, if you do not include your allies you would create suspicion. he had these secret talks in oman which was a god awful idea, and even if you like the deal you have created a level of suspicion now on the deal that makes our allies wary and empowers our adversaries use. the missile part of the program is not touch in the deal. they can continue to do missile fulfillment. the weaponization of their program is not touched. they can continue that. the facility they think they do that is not open to inspection. if you're looking at triggers and for relation of all the modeling they need to do for weaponization, it has happened there. the las
for israel to launch other attempts against other high ranking officials in hezbollah. >> thank you. n.a.t.o. leaders have warned that the n.a.t.o. mission in afghanistan could be in jeopardy if president hamid karzai does not sign the deal with the u.s. >> reporter: yes, the u.s. is increasing the pressure to sign the pact to allow coalition groups to stay in the country after 2014. the afghan government say they would like to sign the deal but on certain conditions. >> predominantly, these two days have been about afghanistan, particularly about the failure of the president had hamid karo put pen to paper and sign off on the security agreement between afghanistan and the coalition forces that will remain in afghanistan after 2020. the failure to even is calls problems from the planning point of view. there have been clarification on the departing afghan delegation. before they left they said that they would sign the deal in good time. they said they fully supported the deal. they put some conditions. they want assurances from the hall litheallies and the coalite mr. karzai puts pen
-- discussion along the lines of n.e you and security -- u. security council resolutions. host: here is john from new york, republican line. caller: i would like to ask the guests about u.s. foreign-policy posture all over the world. isseems that the u.s. leaving parts of the world to iner actors such as russia the middle east, and our allies around the world have less and u.s. to backth them up in a situation where they get in trouble with one of these other actors like china is missing in defense identification zone that they're setting up your to south korea and japan, for instance, had their airlines say that we will .ot respect that zone the u.s. told airlines to the u.s. allzone over the world where they back down, now they are backing down in china, and putin is trying to .e-institute the soviet union all over the world the u.s. is backing down in every situation. can you explain that please? guest: john, thank you for your question. i will talk about two things. i will talk about syria and then china. you raise to two important points. over the last year or so with syria, the assad r
to subvert the protections of section 365-n for u.s. intellectual property by filing bankruptcy in a foreign country and demanding that u.s. courts extend comity, termination of licenses to intellectual property in the foreign proceeding. the provision that the gentleman wants would eliminate important provisions, and the -- that would eliminate -- i'm sorry -- the underlying bill provisions eliminate this uncertainty and would guarantee that licenses to u.s. patents and other i.p. will always be protected in u.s. courts. the gentleman wants something that would undermine that. failing to include this provision, a manufacturer deciding where to build a new fabrication plant would invest his resources in a foreign country that protects i.p. licenses instead of in the united states. the substitute would -- i'm sorry -- the gentleman's provision that he'd like to see in the manager's amendment would encourage offshoring of u.s. manufacturing. so i strongly support the language in the manager's amendment and object to the suggestion that his provision that's not in this amendment, which we'll al
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